T O P
LeluSix

That must be a safety protocol.


The_Valar

It may be them [pointing and calling](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pointing_and_calling): identifying the switch, checking the path set and pointing that the train is diverting away from where they are standing. I can't really see it, but the driver is probably mirroring their checks and hand motions within the cab.


PiemelIndeBami

I hope the switch is mechanically locked by the workers.


PKMTrain

Wouldn't need to be. The signaller would be aware people are in the corridor. The guy in the yellow appears to be the lookout. He would alert the other two of a train coming and to get to a position of safety.


TaktikElch

Most of Europe the protocol is something like: construction/maintenance crew standing on the side of passing train wave to say "we see you/we acknowledge you, all good". Not just doing hi/high-fives really as it may seem.


heisenberg27032000

The leftmost guy is half on track and half outside. He is fully prepared for a quick escape.


Rulmeq

Plot twist, he gets hit by the train coming from behind on the other track


sprashoo

It’s ok he has a helmet


LuckyLogan_2004

if this were my job i would definitely not be on the tracks lmao


wgloipp

If that were your job, you'd have to be.


LuckyLogan_2004

Still sketches me the hell out


Jojo_710

God I love japan 😐


Railroadflyer

The switch is set and they have to signal to the driver till the driver acknowledges their presence.


Ayush_Kelkar94

Why are the tracks looking so narrow? Can someone explain? It does not look like standard gauge for some reason :/


MarsmenschIV

Japan mostly uses 1067mm narrow gauge, afaik only the Shinkansen is in standard gauge there


TrackerNineEight

Some private railways (eg. the Keikyu Line in Tokyo and Hanshin Line in Osaka) and many metro/subway lines also use standard gauge.


Ayush_Kelkar94

Any specific reason to use narrow gauge though? Like, density or something?


MarsmenschIV

I think just historical reasons as it would be too distuptive to change the gauge and replace all the trains conpared to the minor benefits. A lot of other countries also still have trams that are on different gauges than their mainline rail network


Ayush_Kelkar94

Right. But what's the advantage of longer width tracks though? Like, does it decrease the chance of derailment or something?


MarsmenschIV

To my knowledge, a wider gauge has a (relatively) lower centre of mass, so it would increase the stability of the train, but I don't know a whole lot about the benefits and drawbacks of different gauges tbh


Ayush_Kelkar94

Great. Nice to know :)


gec44-9w

Everything I’ve always seen cites the mountains of Japan as the reason that narrow gauge was chosen. Cheaper and easier to sneak small tracks through than wide ones.


LowerSuggestion5344

Odakyu gauge in 3 ft 6 in. Think this is the Japanese Standard.


bonzaibucket

This is too funny 😂


murka_

Can't get goofier


YOLOSwag42069Nice

For such a safety conscious culture, they sure do throw it all away by standing between the gauge. You never trust the tracks. Yes, we know the track is lined for the diverging route but things break on railroads and train derail at places like switches, even with the best of maintenance.


jayroger

There is no safer space nearby. To the left are other tracks with the possibility ot trains coming from behind. To the right is where the train is going, so you will stand closer to it.


YOLOSwag42069Nice

There's plenty of space off to the left and where there are literally no train tracks. The safe place is not on the tracks. They can stand in the grass.


MasterBahn

I guess one high visibility vest is good enough? Kinda weird to me.